twerk the rude
©grizzlysbear

vvhitehouse:

attracted to men sexually, repelled by men emotionally

(Source: jackasslantern)

(source)(via)
, wooooooooooooow , M E


aviculor:

clannyphantom:

why do teenage boys go through that phase where they just imitate female moaning noises

it’s the only way they can hear it

(source)(via)


katyissuperawesome:

fuckyeahcourtneyy:

This is the greatest knock knock joke in the history of all knock knocks jokes ever told, ever.

I think my favourite thing about this is the poor guy asking them not to do this again. how many times has this happened. he knew what was going to happen at the start. is this a regular occurrence

(Source: shittinggold)

(source)(via)


(source)(via)
, oh boy... , but rly tho


churrosforthewin:

the-irish-mayhem:

thetrekkiehasthephonebox:

chekov-in-a-dress:

I want a superhero movie where the hero dies in the first ten minutes and the woman who was supposed to be the love interest puts on his costume and becomes an even better hero.

I want all of the advertising to be for the hero and none of the marketing to even allude to this death.

imagine all the male tears

Now that’s a movie

(source)(via)


ihaveahutchersonproblem:

I have never reblogged anything faster in my life.

(Source: l0ve-pride-deepfried-chicken)

(source)(via)


"

Early in my freshman year, my dad asked me if there were lots of Latinos at school. I wanted to say, “Pa, I’m one of the only Latinos in most of my classes. The other brown faces I see mostly are the landscapers’. I think of you when I see them sweating in the morning sun. I remember you were a landscaper when you first came to Illinois in the 1950s. And look, Pa! Now I’m in college!”

But I didn’t.

I just said, “No, Pa. There’s a few Latinos, mostly Puerto Rican, few Mexicans. But all the landscapers are Mexican.”

My dad responded, “¡Salúdelos, m’ijo!”

So when I walked by the Mexican men landscaping each morning, I said, “Buenos días.”

Recently, I realized what my dad really meant. I remembered learning the Mexican, or Latin American, tradition of greeting people when one enters a room. In my Mexican family, my parents taught me to be “bien educado” by greeting people who were in a room already when I entered. The tradition puts the responsibility of the person who arrives to greet those already there. If I didn’t follow the rule as a kid, my parents admonished me with a back handed slap on my back and the not-so-subtle hint: “¡Saluda!”

I caught myself tapping my 8-year-old son’s back the other day when he didn’t greet one of our friends: “Adrian! ¡Saluda!”

However, many of my white colleagues over the years followed a different tradition of ignorance. “Maleducados,” ol’ school Mexican grandmothers would call them.

But this Mexican tradition is not about the greeting—it’s about the acknowledgment. Greeting people when you enter a room is about acknowledging other people’s presence and showing them that you don’t consider yourself superior to them.

When I thought back to the conversation between my dad and me in 1990, I realized that my dad was not ordering me to greet the Mexican landscapers with a “Good morning.”

Instead, my father wanted me to acknowledge them, to always acknowledge people who work with their hands like he had done as a farm worker, a landscaper, a mechanic. My father with a 3rd grade education wanted me to work with my mind but never wanted me to think myself superior because I earned a college degree and others didn’t.

"

(source)(via)
, good. post.


(Source: reparrishcomics)

(source)(via)


(Source: thefabricpress)

(source)(via)


nezushions:

job interviewer: so where do you see yourself in three years
me: midnight premier of pacific rim 2

(Source: koujack-o-lantern)

(source)(via)